Subject: Making Online Child Protection a Priority Every Day

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EDUCATING FOR TRICKY CONVERSATIONS
Hi Friend,

Held from September 6-12, Child Protection Week was an excellent opportunity to remind ourselves that kids deserve protection AND EDUCATION to help keep them safe - every. single. day. 

There's an urgency to protect kids from and educate them on how to respond to distressing online content such as the video that went viral of suicide. Access this open letter from the eSafety Commissioner to all school principals, providing information on the video, as well as advice and links to relevant resources for preventing and responding to these types of incidents. 

Being exposed to things such as this can be referred to as cybertrauma. Researcher and clinician, Catherine Knibbs, defines cybertrauma as any trauma that can affect anybody at any time through any device. Cybertrauma regularly occurs in our children's lives—more so when they have access to online content that they don't have the emotional or cognitive capacity to understand and process. 

During our LIVE on Wednesday 16 September, we unpacked the vast difference between what we, as the adults in young people's world know about what they experience online, versus the sheer magnitude of the things they are confronted with daily—shocking things that many of us have not considered. Check out this LIVE to find out what we shared.
When it comes to talking with kids about what they see online, there exists a delicate balance around how much "inside knowledge" we need so that we can "be the adult in their life" and effectively support them. For some adults, knowing these details can place our own mental health in a precarious place - for instance, knowing the method used in the widely-publicised suicide may be confronting. However, with teens (and primary school children!) in many classrooms across Australia (and all over the world!) talking about it online and at school, there's a need for caring adults to know these details so we can respond accordingly. This was just ONE incident—we don't hear about countless more. So we encourage you to look after your mental wellbeing—and at the same time, be brave enough to KNOW what kids (potentially) see when they spend any amount of time online so that you are prepared to effectively respond. 

Keep reading below for essential resources to further your learning to keep kids and teens safe:
  • Practical guidance in a blog that we wrote for ParentTV.
  • A course provided for FREE by ParentTV called "How to talk to kids about suicide."
  • A FREE program by the Daniel Morcombe Foundation called "Changing Futures."
  • Our very own IQ PROGRAMS - school curriculum to help kids and teens know how to respond to harmful online content (including p0rnography). 
These exceptional opportunities will resource and support you to upskill to keep young people safe. We hope you find this update helpful and wish you peace and wellbeing. 
Till next time, be well and stay inspired.
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE INTERNET TEACHES OUR KIDS ABOUT SEX 

The internet offers many positive experiences, but it is essential to remember that whatever age we hand kids an internet-connected device, is the same age that we need to be talking about critical safety topics. The internet with all its wonders is not an age-segregated environment. This fact means that children will never be entirely safe online—approximately two-thirds of internet users are over the age of 18, and insidiously, many do not have your child’s safety in mind. READ MORE >>>
FREE COURSE FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: HOW TO TALK TO KIDS ABOUT SUICIDE

As a parent, it’s frightening to hear your child talk about suicide and it can be difficult to know how to help. With suicide the leading cause of death amongst young people, it is important that we have conversations about suicide early, arming our children with the correct information.

In this course, Claire Orange will discuss:
  • When’s the right time to talk to children about suicide?
  • How to talk to your child about suicide
  • How to ask a child about self-harming – their own or others
  • What are the signs that your child is thinking about suicide?
  • Immediate steps if suicide is suspected – what every parent needs to know
FREE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: CHANGING FUTURES

Changing Futures aims to provide educators and frontline staff with the tools they need to identify and respond to harmful sexual behaviours in pre-teens. This program acts in response to research indicating 90% of Australian educators believe existing mandatory reporting training does not equip them with adequate skills in this area. 

COMING UP THIS WEEK:
SEPTEMBER 23 AT 1pm: Webinar 4 - Involving young people in prevention of harmful sexual behaviours. REGISTER NOW

IQ PROGRAMS - SCHOOL CURRICULUM FOCUSSED ON SAFETY AND MENTAL WELLBEING TO PREVENT P0RN AND OTHER HARMS.

IQ PROGRAMS equip educators for the task of supporting kids and teens to author their future. Meeting child-safety, developmental and wellbeing needs, teachers receive guided narratives and comprehensive tools to help them deliver tricky conversations confidently. The following units are available now: Umbrella (ages 6-7), Brain Burger (ages 12-13) and Clean Sweep (ages 14-15).






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Youth Wellbeing Project, PO Box 1055, North Lakes, QLD, 4509, Australia
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