[ASI] Trump's Chumps

May 3rd, 2016 at 1:04 pm EST
Cliff Kincaid
President.
America's Survival, Inc.
www.usasurvival.org
www.noglobaltaxes.org
www.religiousleftexposed.com
www.sorosfiles.com
www.leninandsharia.com



Dear Friend of America’s Survival:

In trying to explain the Donald J. Trump phenomenon, writer David Frum says so-called “true conservatives” now constitute “a pitiful minority of the Republican Party, never mind the country as a whole.” He ask, “Why should any practical politician care about them ever again?”

There is some truth behind his statement and it reflects the impact of cultural Marxism on society. The conservative movement has suffered as a result.  The movement has been infiltrated by frauds and imposters. It has also suffered because of the influence of fake conservatives like Rush Limbaugh, who play along with candidates like Trump because they hang out together on the same golf courses and go to the same country clubs (owned by Trump). Limbaugh masquerades as a Reaganite conservative even though he never voted for Reagan. His “Institute for Advanced Conservative Studies” doesn’t exist. It’s all an act – a show.  The poor guy had a drug problem and is working on his fourth marriage. He’s a victim of cultural Marxism.

Rebuilding the conservative movement means exposing the frauds in our midst and returning to the founding principles.

Trump says, “I’m a conservative but at this point who cares? We’ve got to straighten out the country.” How’s that for dedication to the conservative movement? Conservatism is the method by which you straight out the country.

On CNN yesterday, a good journalist, David Gregory, noted that Donald Trump is “not a conservative” and “barely a Republican.” He’s right on target. Too bad people like Limbaugh won’t utter the truth. Limbaugh straddles the fence on Trump because he doesn’t want to offend Trump’s supporters and lose members of his audience and ratings. This is another mark of a country in decline.

What to do? Former Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal notes that Reagan Republicanism famously rests on three legs: religious (or social) conservatism, national security conservatism, and economic conservatism. Trump is opposed to all three legs. Instead, Trump tweets quotes from Mussolini. 

A lot of hard work is needed to restore the Reagan coalition. Jindall argues :

The challenge for conservatives is to explain anew why our principles are universal and relevant to the modern age, to translate our vision of limited government and increased freedom and opportunity into concrete policies that benefit middle class workers, and to renew our movement so that it truly encompasses a bottom-up approach that empowers individuals to pursue their dreams.

I am convinced now, more than ever, that a big part of the solution lies in decimating the Marxist-dominated system of “higher education” in this country and replacing it with a much more decentralized system that uses low-cost on-line educational options. In short, the technological revolution that came to journalism through the Internet has to come to education. The brick-and-mortar institutions have to go. Such an approach not only makes education more affordable but brings technology into more hands. 

Consider a recent ad from the Washington Post pointing out:

There are currently over 500,000 open computing jobs, in every sector, from manufacturing to banking, from agriculture to healthcare, but only 50,000 computer science graduates a year.

The answer is not Bernie Sanders-type socialism, more debt, and higher taxes. It’s not legalizing marijuana and reducing the IQ of young people, making them cannon fodder for the next stage of Marxist revolution. It’s a real revolution in education, making it cheaper and giving people more and easy access to it.

Some students are lost in dope and socialism. But I think many young people want real jobs. I think they want to be part of society and achieve the American dream.

 

For America's Survival,


Cliff Kincaid, President




 

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